A Guide to the Insects of the Coal Oil Point Reserve


    • Home/Overview
    • Reserve habitats
    • Reserve photos
    • Sampling methods
    • General results
    • Guide to insects
      • Springtails
      • Jumping bristletails
      • Dragon- & damselflies
      • Crickets & grasshoppers
      • Termites
      • Earwigs
      • Webspinners
      • Stoneflies
      • Barklice
      • Aphids & planthoppers
      • True bugs
      • Thrips
      • Lacewings
      • Beetles
      • Fleas
      • Flies
      • Butterflies & moths
      • Bees, ants, wasps
      • Other arthropods
    • Related pages
    • About images
    • Reserve Home
    • SBMNH Home
    • SBMNH Entomology



Funded in part by the UCSB Pearl Chase Fund

Last updated 08/15/2005
       Insects of Coal Oil Point > Guide > Heteroptera - True Bugs

Heteroptera - True Bugs

Heteroptera is a very large and diverse order of insects. True bugs are easily recognized by their front wings, known as hemelytra- where the basal half of the wings are thick and leathery and the tips are membranous. Like Homoptera, their mouthparts are long beaks, which they use to feed on plants or other insects, or in a few cases vertebrate blood. Most true bugs are terrestrial, though a good number are aquatic.

The Coal Oil Point Reserve collection contains 24 species of true bugs.




Navigate by family

Corixidae | Notonectidae | Anthocoridae | Miridae | Reduviidae | Tingidae | Berytidae | Lygaeidae | Rhopalidae | Saldidae | Cydnidae

* Additional information and pictures are available for the families in bold.
True Bug Photos
(click to enlarge)

Corixidae - Water Boatmen




Notonectidae - Backswimmers




Anthocoridae - Minute Pirate Bugs




Miridae - Leaf or Plant Bugs









Additional pictures and information about Miridae

Reduviidae - Assasin Bugs





Tingidae - Lace Bugs





Berytidae - Stilt Bugs





Lygaeidae - Seed Bugs












Rhopalidae - Scentless Plant Bugs





Saldidae - Shore Bugs





Cydnidae - Burrower Bugs




 

Back to:      Orders guide     Top of page
 
 

Page hosted by The Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History